Tag Archives: fat shaming

Body shaming in the media.

In all probability I think that this would be a huge list if I had the time to look through each link and to search for separate celebrities who have been fat shamed in the media in the last 12 months.  Instead I have just picked the top few for this post under the google search term of ‘celebrity body shaming’, to give an idea of who and why people are shamed.  It really is pretty sad that in a world screaming out for equality in everything instead people, and writers in the media, forget that people have the right to enjoy their own diverse bodies without criticism.  Health is the key – if people are healthy and happy then we need to exercise some discretion and be kind to others with our words and thoughts.

Pink, the singer, is here criticised for her weight – she looks super fit to me and very pretty.

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/tvshowbiz/article-3036838/Pink-SLAMS-Twitter-trolls-criticised-weight-following-cancer-benefit.html

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Another article put together features the above Pink reply, and also the ‘attack’ on Kelly Clarkson by Katie Hopkins, as well as other celebs.

http://www.womenshealthmag.com/life/celebrity-fat-shaming-responses

http://www.today.com/popculture/celebrities-responses-body-shaming-see-what-kelly-clarkson-others-said-t13011

This video clip from youtube that features the model, Tyra Banks, talking about the fat shaming she experienced is very emotional, and the response from the women in the studio audience show just how much women are affected by this type of behaviour.

And it would seem that the body shaming has no qualms about criticising pregnant women too.  This report shows that women are shamed for being too fat, too thin (pregorexia is the derogatory term used here!), or anything in between.

http://www.parents.com/pregnancy/my-body/changing/celebrities-who-were-body-shamed-during-pregnancy/#page=7

Now I really love this twist on the troll’s and fat shamers.  This man was filmed at a party having fun and a dance.  Somehow it made its way onto the social media scene and the poor man was absolutely ripped to pieces and teased for being fat.  Then a wonderful thing happened – people worldwide started defending the chap and sticking up for him.  In the end the chap was traced and a huge party was thrown for him!

http://www.today.com/popculture/dancing-man-get-celeb-endorsed-la-dance-party-after-body-t7421

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2015/03/06/dancing-man-found-bodyshamed-dance-party_n_6817794.html

What I find sad about all this body and fat shaming is that people fat shame themselves.  It seems to be a ‘normal’ part of life to be criticised for your body shape and weight, with some teens giving up on feeling good about their bodies, perhaps forever!  I came across a teen acronym that is currently being used – DUFF – and the phrase on a t-shirt saying “I’m somebody’s DUFF”.  What does it mean?  Well the acronym is for the saying “Designated Ugly Fat Friend”.  How sad that a label needs to be put on someone in a group of friends.  Its almost like saying you should only be friends with people who look like your body shape or else your only purpose is to make the slimmer people look better!  If this is the type of teen talk that is going on then its time to move, and fast, to educate these people on diversity and kindness to other humans!

I-m-somebody-s-Duff-Women-s-T-Shirts

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/ally-del-monte/designated-ugly-fat-friend_b_6532840.html

Its not just women celebrities that are criticised.  Texas Ranger MLB star, Prince Fielder, received huge amounts of hate and body shaming for this image.

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http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2014/07/09/prince-fielder-espn-body-shaming_n_5567870.html

This is an interesting article to finish with by Jessi Andricks on Body Shaming.  Jessi is a health coach, yoga instructor and health blogger.  She says in the article:

Treat your body kindly. Nurture it and love it. Feed it with nourishing food and movement. Do things that make you feel good on a deeper level and you’ll notice the surfaces changes don’t matter quite as much. 

Drop the ideas of perfection.Tell your body it is beautiful and absolutely, perfectly, imperfect. These are your unique qualities and traits that you deserve to be proud of. 

Look at yourself and notice the things that you love, not the things you hate. Focus on the positive and the negative won’t seem as prevalent. 

Take action now and do one thing today to quit the body shaming and start living your life.

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/jessi-andricks/body-shaming_b_7050302.html

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Dove Advertisement – Beauty Sketches

Posted on YouTube this video involves a member of the San Jose police force who draws a photofit of a woman as described by herself, and then again as described by another member of the public.  The two images are vastly different, and the artist only draws what he is told, he has no visual contact with either of the people.  Its an emotional video and tells us a lot about how we ‘fat shame’ ourselves and how we think.

“Women are their own worst beauty critics,” Dove says. “Only 4% of women around the world consider themselves beautiful … we decided to conduct a compelling social experiment that explores how women view their own beauty in contrast to what others see.” Dove.

http://mashable.com/2013/04/15/dove-ad-beauty-sketches/

Dove Photoshop Action

A further development that I have found out about was this campaign that was aimed at the people who edit, manipulate and design images of women that have unrealistic bodies in the media and was disguised as a photoshop action which was free to download.  The action, once deployed, turns the image back to its unedited state with a message from Dove saying “Don’t manipulate our perceptions of real beauty” (see screen grab below from video).

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The Photoshop action — a downloadable file that applies an action with a single click — is aimed at art directors who may be creating such ads. The action, which was disseminated on Reddit and other places where Dove thought such art directors might visit, promised to add a skin glow effect, but actually reverted the image to its original state.

It would be interesting to see how the media industry viewed this campaign and if it had any real effect on anyone.  There are plenty of comments under the video/post about it which do not seem to think it was such a good idea as it is not targeting the real cause of the problem.

Cheryl GutierrezMar 6, 2013

PLEASE!!! Talk about misleading, “By speaking directly with those responsible for manipulating our perceptions. Art Directors, Graphic Designers and Photo Retouchers.”

In the Ad world, all of these people take direction from MARKETING and SALES. Creative teams don’t arbitrarily manipulate images without direction and approval from those teams. Blaming the resources who do the work is just ridiculous and irresponsible – but what would you expect from a mega corporation like Unilever? 

Ola K.Mar 6, 2013

this is such a BS, as a graphic designer I can tell you that getting a project with models ALWAYS requires us to do photo manipulation, and it’s required by the client, so instead of targeting designers (people who are trying to keep their jobs instead of getting their work send oversees) why don’t you start targeting the real culprits? that is producers of products who want their product to be associated with unrealistic beauty? that perception has to change on higher level… what you are doing here is like asking a janitor why he’s picking up garbage, ppl shouldn’t litter and he’s responsible for it !!! B freaking S! smarten up DOVE!

http://mashable.com/2013/03/06/dove-photoshop-action/

Don’t use Photoshop to make models slimmer – but feel free to retouch my Facebook profile: Real women reveal double standard when it comes to the airbrush

Don’t use Photoshop to make models slimmer – but feel free to retouch my Facebook profile: Real women reveal double standard when it comes to the airbrush.

Written by Daisy Dumas on 9 February 2012 this article (published in the Daily Mail) reveals a double standard that seems to be applied by women on the issue of photo editing/enhancements.  In the article it discusses that:

  • 41 per cent of women aged 18 to 24 have retouched their photos and 20 per cent of women aged 30 to 34 have done so.
  • Facebook photos, yearbook photos, online dating photos – all are increasingly falling prey to the Adobe magic touch.
  • In fact, 60 per cent said they felt it is ok to tweak personal photos.

This is interesting to note with the current backlash against photo enhancing in magazines and advertisements where women felt that unrealistic expectations were placed on women by being encouraged that they must be ‘perfect’.  Is this trend towards secretly editing your own image for your social media profile part of the pressure placed on women to conform?
Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/femail/article-2098861/Dont-use-Photoshop-make-models-slimmer–feel-free-retouch-Facebook-profile-Real-women-reveal-double-standard-comes-airbrush.html#ixzz3a6pd362C